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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)
, coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: peter dreier is a professor of politics and chair of a department at occidental college and author of a new text called "the 100 greatest americans of the 20th century: a social justice hall of fame." peter dreier, good to have you on this program. >> it is good to be here, tavis. tavis: as i said at the top, there is still not a lot of talk about the least among us. there is a lot of talk about poverty. with a country that has such a social justice history, how is it that this seems to be missing in this campaign? >> i think that the history of this country, particularly the 20th century, it shows that when there are grass-roots p
. the next year at the age of 18i met dr. martin luther king jr.. the action of rosa parks to the people of montgomery and teaching the leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way to get in trouble so for more than 50 years i've been in trouble, unnecessary trouble. [applause] so, across that bridge is a lesson about getting in trouble, and that's what - in america today we need for people to get in trouble, good trouble. [applause] to believe in something that is right and the year and necessary but before we got in any trouble as students and young people we studied. we didn't wake up one morning and say we are going to sit in. we didn't just dream monday we were going to come to washington for march on washington as we did in 1963 from selma to montgomery as we did in 1965. we study and prepare ourselves as college students in high school students in the city of nashville every tuesday night for an entire year a group of us would meet at 6:30 p.m., what gandhi attempted to do in south africa and accomplished in india. a civil disobedience, we studied the great religion of the
. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: allyson felix is one of the most decorated female track stars in recent history. she had a standout performance at the london games. she set the world record on one of the marquee olympic events and is also an advocate on a number of important issues including childhood obesity. good to have you on this program. are you doing all right? >> i am good. tavis: let's do this right quick, bam. these things are heavy. i love this. these are very, very heavy. >> they are heavier than you would expect. tavis: i would be like this. [laughter] tavis: how did it feel to finally get that monkey off your back? >> it was amazing. i felt a mixture of joy and relief at the same time.
sciencenow" here on pbs. that is coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh is an editor at large for salon and the author of a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she joins us tonight from new york. >> thank you, tavis. good to be back. tavis: this title is provocative. "what's the matter with white people?" >> the title has three meanings, but we get stuck on one, thanks to mitt romney and paul ryan. why does it happen that 90% of identified republicans according to the gallup poll are white in a country that is now 62% non- hispanic white? looking at this house some moved away towards the democratic p
in tux tuscaloosa and who was a colleague of dr. king. bishop hersem told dr. williams they were looking for someone to integrate the unfortunate of alabama, if they knew somebody who could do it. i was chosen. it's very, very strong. it was two weeks in december when i was notified and i started in january. >> you ended up staying there two years? >> i stayed five and a half years. >> it was strange, especially coming from the bay area, in terms of how radical people are. and going to alabama. >> what did you too much it. >> i taught religious studies. i dealt with black religion, introductory course on black religion. i taught a course on howard thurman. i taught a course called religion and social institutions. the unfortunate of alabama also had a very clean period. there was three weeks between the end of the regular school and the beginning of the regular school and you could did all kind of creative things. i taught a course on the civil rights movement. i went to selma to montgomery to atlanta. in atlanta, we met king's father, dr. abernathy, jose williams yes >> did you ever thi
." we're glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sheila bair is the former chair of the fdic. her efforts to take on wall street excess and stand up for average americans is the subject of the new text "bull by the horns." to goodve you on this program. >> thank you for having me. tavis: let me start with the news of this week. everybody knows in 48 hours, for the first time, mitt romney and mr. obama will come face to face in a debate. if you were jim wednesday night, where these issues are concerned, at the economy, how we avoid what has happened already, how we avoid falling into another recession, around those issues, what ought to be debated wednesday night?
coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey sachs back to this program. he is one of the most important voices in our time. the director of the earth institute at columbia. his latest book is called "the price of civilization." he joins us tonight from new york. jeffrey sachs, good to have you back on this program. >> good to be back on. tavis: what has happened in this country since you wrote this book that made to put some new stuff in it for the paperback version? >> this book was about things really going wrong in america. the lack of civic virtue among the rich and powerful that we have expected and that we need. after i put the pen down in a wr
with ari berman from "the nation" comin gup now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ari berman is a political correspondent for "the nation" and author of the book "herding donkeys." last year he wrote a piece called "the gop war on voting." much of what he wrote has come to fruition. he joins us from new york. good to have you on this program. >> i am a longtime admirer. thanks for having me. tavis: honored to have you on. let me talk about this piece you wrote for "rolling stone." i don't want people to think we are demonizing or casting aspersions on the gop, but i want you to lay out the facts. is it the case that most of this push, these strict voter i.d. laws, this is being pus
, we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome andrew mccarthy to this program. he is now an award winning travel writer that serves as an editor at large for national geographic travel. the his critically acclaimed book is called "along the way home." nice to have you on this program. i assume that you must be tackled at the reception this book is receiving. >> it is also a huge relief because it is a complicated thing. it is a relief when it is received in a nice way so that it can stand and rise and fall on its own as opposed to some weird baggage it gets from being my history. tavis: yeah, yeah. were their doubts or trepidation about
. a conversation with filmmaker ava duvernay coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ava duvernay became the first african-american woman to win best director at this year's sundance film festival. the movie is set in south l.a. and looks at the life of a woman whose husband is sentenced to eight years in prison. here are some scenes from "middle of nowhere." >> do not be marder. >> i am a wife. >> we will see each other every weekend. >> i do not want you to stop for me, baby. >> we're somewhere in between, in the middle place. >> he is a convicted felon. >> i am trying. we're trying. >> excuse me. i thought that was you. i am bryan. >> it cannot see 2 feet in front of you. >> i'm
. that is next time. will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs.
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just tried to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed two million dollars to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out color. -- we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: phyllis bennis is the new director for the international ism project. she joined us tonight from new york. it is good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you, tavis. poopsie but in and ryan went -- tavis: biden and ryan went after it tonight. it was interesting for a lot of people to watch. but we get back to it really matters, the two guys at the top of the ticket, president obama and governor romney. given that governor romney came back out with his own policy speech, that policy will get on to the agenda in the next two debates in the last debate is exclusively about fo
on there! feliz "before sunrise, before sunset." >> there is a saying that dr. king said that there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have a lot of work to do. wal-mart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can hunger.ut unde >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome ethan hawke to this program can he is out this month with a new film called "sinister." i was flattered and floor when i got a call from him to play a small part in this film. frankly, not too much of an acting stretch. i get to play myself. [laughter] here now are some scenes. >> you have to be kidding me. bar-b-q's. that is the family who live here. you think these are serial murders? >> i don't know. the first one dates back to 1960's. >> the only link to these cases is this symbol. >> it is associated with the pagan jd pin he consumes the souls of human c
are glad you have joined us. a conversation coming out right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: job as the national affairs editor for new york magazine and a political analyst for msn bc. he wrote the best-selling book "game change. his election issue of new york magazine is on newsstands and he joins us tonight from new york. thank you for coming back. >> i am happy to be here. tavis: glad to have you. let me start with the obvious. tomorrow is a big night for the president. i suspect the format of this town hall set up that is very different from mano a mano might play differently to both of these guys but it doesn't put him in the position of having to be the enforcer tomorr
that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome d.l. hughley back to this program. later this month, you can catch his all new comedy special, called "d.l. hughley: the endangered list." the one-hour special airs saturday, october 27 on -- at 11:00 on comedy central. here is a preview. >> one of the groups we have got to start with -- lobbyists. i want to tell you i i am here. this is a little bit insane, but it is the real thing. i am trying to get the black man put on the endangered species list. >> it sounds a little crazy. definitely not the craziest things we have worked on. we have worked on protecting chimpanzees and babies from falling down stairs. >> babies from falling downstairs'? >
with michael chiklis coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome michael chiklis back to this program. the star of "the shield" is back in prime time with tv's most- watched new show, "vegas." the show airs tuesday night at 10:00 on cbs. here is a scene. >> i tailored every last detail. my best room, my best boost -- booze. they let you win. that is because you cannot handle your losses like a man. having said that, we took an oath. you want me to take anyone out, i will. i got to admit, i enjoy it. but it is the wrong move. not because he is a decent man, he is not. not because it will come to our side, he will not. if we take him out, best-case
nagourney of the new york times coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: adam nagourney is the l.a. bureau chief for the new york times following years as the paper's chief national political correspondent. good to have you back on this program. we finally arrive at a day i thought would never come. the debates are finally over. it just two weeks from election day. it has been a perennial campaign. let me start with a question that has been on my mind a lot. what do you make of the perennial, never-ending campaign? if you like mitt romney and lose four years ago, the campaign never stops. even if you are obama and u.n. four years ago, the campaign never stop
. a conversation with peter nicks coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the issue of health care has been a constant conversation in this country over the past few years, amplified during this campaign season. behind the politics of health care is the reality of what many americans face, especially in inner cities. peter nicks decided to chronicle a day in a life of an open emergency room. the film is called "the waiting room" and is being called one of the best documentary projects of the year. it is playing in select cities across the country. here are some scenes from the "the waiting room." you have to wait for that -- >> you have to wait for the same d
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: if you think they are not any big ideas out there, salman khan is a man with a big idea. he founded the free nonprofit khan academy to provide free education to anyone, anywhere. he has delivered more than 45 million lessons today. salman khan, good to have you on this program today. when you say the one world schoolhouse, what do you mean by that? >> it was intentionally in chosen to be interpreted a couple of different ways. it is kind of a play on words, to harken back to the one-room schoolhouse where you have the students all helping each other, more time with the teacher. tavis: for those who are not yet familiar with your work,
us with dr. peter ubel. right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. peter ubel is a widely respected scientist and physicians at duke university. his latest text is called "critical decisions." doctor, good to have you on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: i should have put a darker blue tie on. my apologies to you and all of the good folks at duke. it seems to me that so often when doctors and patients get together, what they are talking about, doctor, are life and death decisions. tell me how honesty, how transparency, how open this enters the room in a setting like that -- how open this -- op
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)